MontageArt: Abstract Portrait of a Brazilian Fashion Jeweler

Montageart "African" collection jewelry. Image Montageart.

Montageart African Necklace. Image Montageart.

 

I have a deep love for the way in which Brazilian artists and designers see the world. Having studied 5 years in Brazil, I was able to get a sense of fashion trends, learn about popular fashion designers, take in how they interpret popular and folk cultural inspirations and follow their fashion week coverage. Beyond this, I have such an appreciation for the jewelry created by indigenous Brazilians, as well as, by artists with brands or even those that can be bought on a beach or roadside.  I ran across the brand Montageart recently, and decided they’d be a fit for the blogazine. They are beyond creative and this is evident in both their jewelry line and artistic home decor and lighting. They had me at the gigantic necklace they created as wall decor! The artist’s definition of Montage is “a combination of images taken from any number of media (photographs, film, and handmade). These images can be whole or partial, glued together on a surface (such as a photomontage), or edited together to produce a video or film” (arthistory.about.com).  When one gazes at their pieces, they can begin to understand why they chose this name. They create with each piece, a sort of an accessories collage. Their necklaces and bracelets are very editorial but also textural. Their work has been featured in Brazilian Cosmopolitan, Estilo, Shape, Elle and on well known figures.

Montageart jewelry in Shape Brazil.

Montageart jewelry in Shape Brazil.

 

I was instantly drawn to their armor style modern, but earthy mesh pieces. These oversized examples have such style and fashion references as well.  Some of my favorite designs can be seen below. You can also browse more of their creative process and jewelry examples via their instagram.

mesh necklace Montageart

Amazing montageart headdress via https://instagram.com/loo_ana/

Amazing montageart headdress via https://instagram.com/loo_ana/

The Interview:

When did you begin making jewelry and why?

We started in 2002 as a hobby, when we realized that we could turn it into a business. Eduardo is an architect and I (Alex) am a graphic designer. Today, we work as designers for Montageart. We discovered that people had been looking for accessories to mix with their jewelry in order to create unique looks. We then started selling as this aesthetic became a trend, incorporating such vintage pieces. We were sort of in the right place at the right time. Our strength is in the mix of materials and the superposition of layers without limits.

Vietnam collection image. Montageart.

Vietnam collection image. Montageart.

Vietnam collection 2015. Montageart.

Vietnam collection 2015. Montageart.

What are some of the things you look to for inspiration each season?

Our latest collection was inspired on Vietnam. We have always researched diverse cultural groups and have chosen a few of these as a theme for some of our collections. However, we are not limited to such inspiration. We have used different themes such as bees, travel, etc.

Montageart bee necklaces. image by Montageart.

Montageart bee necklaces. image by Montageart.

Explain your process for design and construction?

We have a sort of intuitive process during the construction of the pieces. We always try to be attentive to what is happening. Also, taking into account the attitude and wide diversity of the people who wear our jewelry. We keep an open mind and don’t get caught up in trends, but we do pay attention to them. 

Montageart image, large decorative necklace wall art.

Montageart image, large decorative necklace wall art.

What were some of your favorite creations so far?

Besides accessories we created a brand of objects for home decor. Sort of decor out of objects, right now our favorite is a large “collar” made to decorate the wall.  

Does Brazil inspire your designs in any way?

Yes, but not solely. As it was mentioned before, we are always open to new ideas and contrasts. Again, with no limits.

What are some of your favorite materials to work with?

Many. We really like textile treads in general, crystals, rough stones, and metals- which we also dye. We are constantly experimenting with new materials.

Fashion inspirations current or past?

We like a lot Karl Lagerfeld, Manish Arora, Vivienne Westwood, Miucha Prada. Among Brazilian designers, Antonio Bernardo and Amir Slama…

Who are your jewelry icons, maybe a brand you look up to, styles 1920s, art deco, 1970s, Victorian?

Miriam Haskell ,YSL Bijoux, Cartier, Paco Rabanne, 1920s/art deco  jewelry, antique pieces, tribal/ethnic jewelry. We are always doing research look not only to the history of the accessory, but decoration, art etc.

Chinese Imperial Beads: Jewelry Find of the Week

Chinese Imperial necklace, 19th century. Eden Galleries image.

Chinese Imperial necklace, 19th century. Eden Fine Antique Galleries image.

I often attend auctions, private sales, scout private collections, hunt abroad and on. I think fashion jewelry, collectors and accessories lovers alike will enjoy seeing them. Most of these are available accessories for purchase at auction or in shops, that I run across during my jewelry hunt. This week’s find is a Chinese Chinese Pearl Imperial Court ChaoZhu Beads. China, 19th C., Qing imperial court necklace.  There two necklaces are my favorites from this auction and with the Met exhibit-China through the looking glass, these pieces fit the mood of the month.  Offered at Eden Fine Antiques Galleries Showroom. Preview starts May 20th in Marietta Georgia. This is an online auction as well. 

Chinese Imperial necklace, 19th century. Eden Galleries image. Chinese Pearl Imperial Court ChaoZhu Beads. China, 19th C., Qing imperial court necklace comprised of well strung 108 natural round shape Pearls accented by four larger agate beads bordered with smaller green jade beads. circled toward the center Fotou connecting to a golden-yellow ribbon suspending Oval shaped Filigree emblem-ed with green jade, followed by a quartz crystal tear shaped pendant. Eden Fine Antiques Gallery description and image. Available at auction.

Chinese Imperial necklace, 19th century. Eden Galleries image. Chinese Pearl Imperial Court ChaoZhu Beads. China, 19th C., Qing imperial court necklace comprised of well strung 108 natural round shape Pearls accented by four larger agate beads bordered with smaller green jade beads. circled toward the center Fotou connecting to a golden-yellow ribbon suspending Oval shaped Filigree emblem-ed with green jade, followed by a quartz crystal tear shaped pendant. Eden Fine Antiques Gallery description and image. Available at auction.

A RARE and IMPORTANT Chinese ChenXiang Beads in Filigree (gilt over silver) Trinket Box  Chinese ChenXiang Prayer's Beads Necklace comprised of well strung carved round shape ChenXiang wood accented by three larger Tourmaline beads. Circled toward the center Jade Fotou followed with a double-gourd turquoise bead connecting to a golden-yellow ribbon suspending flower shaped cloisonne cartouche emblem-ed with oval shaped green jade, followed by brown and green tassels. Eden Fine Antiques Gallery description and image.

A RARE and IMPORTANT Chinese ChenXiang Beads in Filigree (gilt over silver) Trinket Box
Chinese ChenXiang Prayer’s Beads Necklace comprised of well strung carved round shape ChenXiang wood accented by three larger Tourmaline beads. Circled toward the center Jade Fotou followed with a double-gourd turquoise bead connecting to a golden-yellow ribbon suspending flower shaped cloisonne cartouche emblem-ed with oval shaped green jade, followed by brown and green tassels. Eden Fine Antiques Gallery description and image.