Jewelry Report Card: H is for Hand Forged

Want a really really good stack, I think I may have the answer for you! This Sunday takes us back in time, in some ways, to when jewelry and items were made by hand, forged in fire- so to speak. We find the jewelry in question, in LA inside a retail concept space called ELU.  I discovered them via instagram, and am hooked on the look and construction of the pieces. The jewelry is substantial and tactile, featuring gemstones hand placed inside the forged metals.  So todays A++ goes to @elu_official as a line to watch, and a page to follow!  Elu was started by Cristina Nicoletti, when she decided to begin selling artisanal luxury goods from all over the world. This led to a meeting of the minds and friends, which evolved into a new creative space in West Hollywood. They also carry bags, perfume, shoes, scarves, hats, and sunglasses. The new jewelry line ELU, definitely caught my eye and is the fruit of a partnership with Evan Sugerman of Parts of Four, which is based in Bali.

I’m a lover and collector of the authentic jewelry of “tribes”, indigenous peoples, and taxco pieces. However, as enticed as I am by such pieces I also love the modernist movements of the 50s and today. Perhaps this is why I am drawn to this line of jewelry so much.  Hopefully, our readers will also see the allure of the pieces by ELU.

What We Covet: 

Why We Follow: 

Elu Los Angeles
8750 Holloway Dr.
West Hollywood, CA 90069
310-358-0910

https://elubycn.com

*All images via ELU online and @elu_official, rights reserved.

Sunday Jewelry Report: A Class In Jewelry Design

Today’s jewelry report card focuses on a relatively new designer, whose pieces are a class in how to push boundaries in jewelry design. I hope that this is a Sunday read that will wake you up and get your jewelry juices flowing! Veronica Fabian gets an A++ from us for her innovative yet well designed chic approach to this design form. While she doesn’t currently have her pieces listed for sale online, she does have a portfolio style website, where one can contact her. The artist has a BA in jewelry design from the University of Arts in London. Her award list spans 2016-2018 and it is not a short list. She has been shown in museum exhibits and her latest works which I will highlight here in the order of which I love most, will surely inspire.  Her history is one that starts with an artistic family, turns to economics and banking, and inevitably reverses back to the jewelry art form.

One can see she is drawn to themes in jewelry like chains and traditional aspects which she then turns on their head and elevates.  Her pieces could easily translate on the runway or the museum floor. They touch on human themes and women’s rights in constructed and narrative ways as well.  So without further ado my favorite pieces and where to follow her work.

VERONIKA FABIAN:

Why We Follow Her:

English Antique Jewellery and Ebay

This morning we are going to indulge a guilty pleasure vie ebay. It is not often one can find the glorious amount of quality antique pieces, the likes of those we will explore today via our A++ instagram account to follow @englishantiquejewellery.  I stumbled across this jewellery shop and have become a bit smitten.  I think they appeal to me because their finds remind me of those precious little unique antique relics I found as a young child, which led me to collect vintage jewelry. They seem to have bottled that magic feeling of discovery.  The owner’s eye is such that they present the shopper with the opportunity to explore the world of true antique jewelry in all mediums. Pieces from the Victorians and the 1920s, lush silvers, and detailed artifacts. Now, since one has to be on top of such auctions to get a chance at the prize, following their weekly sales via ig is a must.  The shop is accessible via eBay only, auctions straight to us from the UK where they reside. The shop has been in business since 2009. To be honest had I discovered them via eBay, the shop’s impact would have been somewhat lost. The array of photography and finds they post on instagram is really impressive and allows them to shine. They post lovely compositions and unique pieces daily. Thus, today’s Jewelry Report Card winner is really for my flea market and antique jewelry lovers, who are always on the hunt for a great score. This secret source will not disappoint. So without further ado:

What We Love: ( a tribute to the best pieces they have listed and we have loved). Shop Current Auctions Here.

Why We Follow:

  • All images belong to Antique English Jewelry via their eBay shop and instagram.

Sunday Jewelry Report: Shopping Bow and Arrow NYC

Enjoy an afternoon in the midst of various Native American jewelers, under the roof of a store that celebrates artisans of various Native North American cultures today. Stack the silver and get ready to explore our A++ pick for one to follow on instagram. Firstly, what attracted me to Bow and Arrow NYC, is the way the shop is sort of a new take on the contemporary Native American jewelry gallery. Started in 2011 by Leslie O’Kelley-Maiden, it brings together a group of southwestern indigenous jewelry designers, whose skills with sterling and various stones are evident in their hand made works.  The shop is founded on the stories of it’s designers in a cooperative and beautiful way.  The turquoise they use comes form North American sources as discussed in her link about the stones, here. Their shop’s work has been seen in Porter magazine and on Kesha.

Enjoy the video of how and why she does what she does:

Bow & Arrow X Convicts from Convicts on Vimeo.

Her respect for Navajo (Dine) culture among others resonates with me. Her short film does a great job illustrating the connections between jewelry, artwork, and culture. Not only does the jewelry validate the things discussed in the video above, they are visually beautiful pieces, supporting a continued heritage, and are current in their relevancy.

WHAT WE WANT:

WHY WE FOLLOW: ( She does a great job giving us tips on styling these pieces!)

*All images belong to Bow and Arrow NYC and Leslie via her instagram and website!

Jewelry Report Card: The Cut London and Meghan Markle Have Us Thinking About Alternative Wedding Rings

Today we take you to London, which only a day ago was in a flurry of activity due to the royal wedding. Whether you admit it or not, married or not, male or female you’ve been fantasizing just a bit about what it would be like to be Meghan or Harry. I’m waving goodbye in my jag with that aquamarine ring, off to a swanky royal after party…wait BUT I digress …Harry’s gift of Princess Diana’s aquamarine ring, which Diana bought after the divorce to wear, instead of her former wedding ring, had me thinking about alternative wedding ring styles!  This is why we chose The Cut London as our A++ recipient for our Sunday jewelry report card. We are handing the grade out to Kate as one to follow on instagram for her unique offerings.  As we go into summer, keeping up with The Cut London is not a bad idea, whether you want to reward yourself with a unique piece, buy someone a promise ring, or pick out that forever style for your big day.

Started by Kate Baxter a jewellery designer, who wanted to help revolutionize the engagement ring world by seeking out unique bespoke pieces, the selection does not disappoint. She offers her all of this online, from unique cuts to colored gemstones at THE CUT LONDON. There is also a tailored selection of antique rings in her repotroire. She books consultations and helps find original one of a kind pieces for clients from her base in London. If one is overwhelmed or actually underwhelmed by the selection of engagement rings out there she specializes in finding something outside the box.  @thecutlondon is full of new pieces, inspiration, gifts or jewelry shopping guides ,and gorgeous designs posted daily, with an email link directly to Kate. She often mentions new finds from up and coming jewelry designers, as well including earrings or whatever else strikes her fancy! Since she is constantly searching for unique pieces many are not online so following here gives you access to some pieces you may only see during a consultation!

What We Love:

Why We Follow: 

*All images from The Cut London, via instagram and their website!

Sunday Jewelry Report Card: Going to the Source with Rachel Garrahan

Have your Sunday breakfast in luxury reading one of the many quality articles done by this report card winner! One aspect that seems to be a connecting force for a few very successful jewelry based magazines and such publications is freelance writer Rachel Garrahan.  As such, we wanted to bring you right to the source, her instagram account. Why miss out on the plethora of gorgeous images and links to her newest articles. She discusses all things sparkly for the New York Times, 1stdibs, Vanity Fair, Town and Country magazine, the Jewellery Editor and the list goes on… Her instagram images are gorgeous as she also visits jewelers, galleries, picks her favorite finds, and reports on collections via the account.

Lion via Rachel and @hancocks_london

She discusses all types of luxury jewelry; from contemporary collaborations, new artists on the scene, rare estate pieces at auction, to ancient jewels.

Art is one of my favorite jewelry designers of all time, just look at this piece on Rachel’s wrist!

Why We Follow Her:

What We Love:

3D Jewelry, The New York Times. 

Exotic Fables, The Jewellery Editor. 

British Gems From the 1960s, Mahnaz Collection.

Jewelry Armor, New York Times article. 

How Female Collectors are Driving in a New Era of Watch Design

*All images belong to Rachel’s via her instagram page.

Sunday Jewelry Report Card: Ushering in Spring with Madina Visconti Jewelry

Today’s jewelry report card selection is almost like a necessary ritual to bring forth spring. Her pieces seemingly contain a sort of earthly power held in the enamels and forms.  Let’s just say I now know what I want to wear to the May pole and the city next time I’m there. The A++ jewelry report card goes to Madina Visconti di Modrone. She is based in Milan and her jewelry roots itself in both modern form/sculpture, and natural incarnations. It feels like her enamels are catching the perfect Italian light and freezing it for us. Her work is also playful, the right scale, and has movement.  Her mother Lucio Fontana, was a jeweler and she remembers as well as draws from her childhood experiences.  The pieces are not fine jewelry in the sense of gold, but are on that level, yet allow the jewelry lover to indulge.  Each piece is made in 24k gilt bronze and silver.  The family talent runs deep with her sister Osanna also creating objects and furniture.  

She has a boutique in Milan’s historical center on Via Santa Maria for anyone who is in the area.  The jewelry designer has been featured in Vogue, W as one to watch, and worked on collaborations with Matthew Chevallard founder of a footwear brand, as well as designers presenting at Milan fashion week.  As Vogue mentioned in their article about Madina, she made a series of bronze pieces for the shoes including Italian food elements such as pasta. While her new collection is like the Garden of Eden in spring, other works by her include snakes, thorns, and harder edged themes.  I like her mix of both sides of life.

Her work can be found in her Milan boutique and on-madinavisconti.com as well as Artemest.com.

What We WANT:

 


Why We Follow Her: (well some of her spectacular designs aren’t online and we want to request them, her new items hit instagram and her Milan boutique).

Sunday Jewelry Report: A Walk with Ullmann Antique Jewelry

What is better on a Sunday then to enter the 5th generation jewelry shop as you stroll the streets of London?  I’ve had a fascination with all things from England and really the whole United Kingdom lately, although my first encounter with the area was in my teens, when I spent a bit of time there one summer. Today’s A++ jewelry report goes to A.R. Ullmann antique jewelry. 

The first reason we chose them, is that they are a well established firm, based in London’s “Jewellery Quarter” specializing in Georgian to Art Deco jewelry and everything in between those eras. Also, I love stories that begin ages ago, and such is the story of this particular jewelry destination.

Joseph Ullmann.

In 1902, Joseph Ullmann established his jewelry shop in Budapest. During the 1920s he was joined by his son, officially making it a family affair.  However; in 1944, after over 40 years in business they were forced to flee, because of Nazi invasion.  During this period the original shop was destroyed and looted. But Joseph’s son Andrew was not deterred, and in 1951 he opened the 10 Hatton Garden shop, which is the subject of our jewelry report today.

Their jewelry can be shopped in that original location or online. They are also one to follow on instagram, for their beautiful photographs and unique finds. I love the romantic nature of their pieces and images. With the location and long European history of jewelry design, one never knows what they may find or post. Although, they do seem to have quite the assortment of antique whimsical creature and bug jewelry, as well as fantastic rings!

What We Want:

Why We Follow Them:

Gripoix, Paris Interview: The DNA of a Jewelry Icon

 

If ever there was costume jewelry that could be called “haute couture”, the examples made by Gripoix, in Paris over the years for the couturiers, fit this definition. Not made of gold or diamonds, but of glass and gilt metal by hand…the work of the house represented some of the finest artisanship in the industry. Let’s follow them as they push forward into the future.

Gripoix for Schiaparelli. Recent collab image. Photograph courtesy of Gripoix, Paris.

My fascination with Gripoix started with the acquisition of Chanel pieces from the 30s-90s made by Gripoix and older examples made not for just Chanel, but beautiful nonetheless. This led to my interest in researching articles, images, and texts on the subject. Many sought after rare pieces were made for indeed Chanel and other fashion houses like Worth, Pioret, YSL, Balenciaga, Dior…but Gripoix also made pieces early on for private clients. Most of the earliest examples can be recognized from a few characteristics, such their use of handmade glass beads, pearls and sometimes the mark Made in France.

Early clasp style and beading example, marked France.

Although, it is important to note that various vintage pieces marketed as made by Gripoix online, are not actually even pate de verre. The back is telling in that it should have a poured appearance. One should look at themes, coloration, and design as well.

Back of the poured glass belt by Gripoix for Chanel. Believed to have been designed or executed with Goossens.

As an admirer of the jewelry for quite a while, my interest was renewed in their history and current jewelry team. They recently have begun working with designers on limited examples and creating custom orders for clients themselves. The custom orders as I understand it will be made to specification and are one of a kind or limited. My intention is not to address here the definitions of couturiers (legally here), but to recognize the brand’s past relationship to haute couture producers/ or couturiers while looking at their future as a jewelry brand. See our previous post on books and definitions.

Lou Lou de La Falasai vintage earrings. Gripoix glass.

1950s example made for Coco Chanel, based I think on a fine design by Verdura.

Piece made by Gripoix for and signed Gripoix.

TIMELINE:

MAISON GRIPOIX, Paris began to produce poured glass or “Pate de Verre” jewelry in 1869, using a special technique of molten glass and enamel which was poured into the metal. They began with pearls and this sort of “gemstone glass” technique reproducing the jewelry of the elite in costume form and working with the French theater.

Great early example of the pearl effect and fine Byzantine style Gripoix construction.

They became more popular when Augustine began creating pieces for specifically for Sarah Bernhardt at the end of the 19th century to be worn by her on stage. The works were theater style recreations of fine pieces and romantic historic designs.

By the 1920s Suzanne Gripoix continued to cement the brand’s role as an iconic producer of couture costume jewelry, with the creation of jewelry for Paul Pioret, Worth, Chanel, Lanvin, etc. The couturiers wanted jewelry that complimented the various moods and themes of their designs. They were part of the overall look for each season. They invented the most realistic faux pearl for Chanel and brought her costume interpretation of Byzantine fine examples to life. Those deep jewel toned pieces and the beautiful poured flowers have become iconic. However; it was still the glass beads again at this early stage that were very popular. The secret of pouring glass flowers was said to have been passed down from the founder.

Collection BillyBoy* Purchased in the 1970s directly from Mme Gripoix. These are prototypes and samples circa 1950s-60s.

Collection BillyBoy* Purchased in the 1970s directly from Mme Gripoix. These are extremely rare and offer us a glimpse into the history and process of the brand.

Robert Goossens for Chanel.

With Robert Goossens in the 1950s, the poured glass designs became more popular among Chanel patrons and collectors. According to some, Goossens did the designs and sometime metalwork, sometimes using fine examples, for Coco Chanel then they were copied by Chanel in Gripoix glass. His training with Parisian workshops and jewelers made him especially skilled as did being the son of a foundry owner in Paris. It is also possible that the Gripoix glass cabochons were supplied to him based on the design,then glued in later by Goossens. He also produced some similar techniques in his studio, so there is some confusion in terms of production, especially later when he became a sort of individual producer of jewelry for design houses as well.

Goossens for Chanel vintage case, Gripoix details. Signed Chanel. Photo courtesy of BillyBoy*

Gripoix necklace, collection of BillyBoy*

1938 Schiaparelli Brooch. Made by Gripoix. From the collection of BillyBoy* Instagram image courtesy of BillyBoy*

Collection BillyBoy*. Gripoix.

Gripoix poured glass necklace for Jacques Fath. Seen in the text Costume Jewelry for Haute Couture by Florence Muller. This style is often identified as Chanel, but nonetheless it is 50s Gripoix in construction.

Josette, Suzanne’s daughter followed her as head of Gripoix, at which point they were already working with Dior, Yves Saint Laurent, Balenciaga, Lacroix, Balmain…among others. By the 1980s the demand was weakening, in favor of less expensive processes overseas.

Late 1980s example of the Byzantine Gripoix style. Chanel.

Her son, Thierry we believe then sold the brand in 2006 to TWS. The next owner Ms. Keslassy, also had the vision of making Gripoix more known as its own brand and more widely sold. This strategy alone has been a hard one. She worked on making designs relevant and a bit more accessible today, as well as simpler in style. Recently, she left the company and it has come to be owned by an investor who is (anonymous). Some collaborations, such as that with Catherine Baba have led to pieces which merge the history with new fashion styles. Her pieces were inspiring because they drew from Sarah Bernhardt and pushed the designs to results similar to that seen in the 70s and 80s.

Hint magazine image of Catherine’s collection click link to see more.

This is where our interview begins. The new creative director, Fanni Fischer produces one collection a  year in Paris and opens the showroom up to wholesalers of the collection. It is sold directly in their shop in Paris, as well.

Gripoix for Schiaparelli.

Recently there seems to be a uptick in demand as collectors and brands begin to seek out these rare vintage creations. Gripoix has also started to work again with more fashion houses and is seeking to keep to its roots as producers of jewelry for designers. As for couturiers, as less of them exist and are legally certified this question becomes a larger more complex one indeed.

Yet, we must appreciate the art of the creations of the past and Gripoix’s works for couturiers to understand why what happens to the brand today is important and how a new market overall affects that strategy. Let’s look at further examples and probe into the new brand’s intentions with our interview below. Examples of recent “collections” done each season include The Botanical Garden Collection.

Red Currant necklace by Gripoix. Last Season.

 

THE INTERVIEW:


Are any original artisans who worked for the family for more than 10 years still working with Gripoix?

There is one artisan, Thomas Lebouille who worked for the third generation of the Gripoix family before, he learnt the technique there.

Is Virginie Curbilie, who trained was trained at Gripoix still working with you? What is her role?

No, it’s been a long time that Virginie is no longer our glassmaker. There is no training for this profession at school. I learnt this fabulous technique from her by observing her gestures, and after she left, I became the master of glass at Gripoix.

Gripoix Paris image.

Where do you get the glass used, is the quality important?

Our glass sticks came mainly from Italy now. I like the Italian glass it’s easy to work with and they have beautiful colours.

How many creative directors have you had? Who?

Marie Keslassy was our artistic director for a long time. She collaborated with other designers like Elisa Nalin for example. The way how they created the jewels was very new for us. They wanted to realize more fashionable, geometrical shapes and that’s how we modernized the technique too. Sometimes this task was not easy with the glass. Today we use more floral shapes, and ornamental patterns to keep the good quality and the naturally curved shape of the glass.

Could you give us a sense of how the pieces were signed through the years?

Gripoix never signed the pieces. It’s been more recently that Gripoix Paris exists as a brand individually and signs the jewels. Gripoix was the supplier of the big fashion houses, the design came from the designers and the amazing technique and realisation from Gripoix. The other reason is that it was not so important at that time to put the logo on every piece, not like today…

Also, do you still have the drawings and sketches? What is left of the old archives?

We have a few of them but not from the old archives. We have mostly sketches and pictures.

Could you give us a sense of the main design elements used on antique Gripoix pieces from the early 19th century, do you have any images of such pieces?

At that time the main characteristic of the custom jewelleries was the imitation of the Byzantine jewels. To have this aspect they mixed the jewels with metal stamps, which came from a supplier called ‘Janvier’, they are in Paris and they still have beautiful pieces from that period. They have a huge collection of metal stamps, more than 1000 references. An amazing place to visit when you are in Paris. Also, they used the glass to imitate the precious stones. To get this finishing they created the jewels with ruby, emerald, sapphires, topaz colours, with an irregular, called baroque surface.

Describe Robert Goossens’ role in the history of the brand as you see it?

I’m so sorry, but this question is very hard for us, as we don’t have any information about this. I think it’s only Goossens and Chanel who could clarify this question or someone from the Gripoix Family.

What makes your technique so special, I’ve seen the color card- I’d say that is one aspect?

Our technique is special because of the glass work. There are only a few artisans around the world who can ‘ flow the glass’ in this way, directly in the metal. It’s a very old ‘savoir faire’ what we are meant to pass from generation to generation.

Fanni what led you to Gripoix?

The magic of the glass. I always wanted to learn this technique. As I’m also a jewellery maker and designer, I tried to do jewels with the glass before at home, but I couldn’t as I didn’t have the right materials for. When I learnt that this is Gripoix’s speciality, I knew that I should work here, that this profession was made for me.

Gripoix Octopus by Schiaparelli. Gripoix, Paris photograph.

Who are some current fashion houses you intend to work with or are working with today?

In the past 3 years, we had several collaborations with Schiaparelli and today too we are working on a very nice project with them. We worked also with YDE, we made very nice scarabs for them. Also we might have a collaboration with another well known fashion designer, but this is a top secret for the moment;)

I know you said you are working on recovering the history and archives, does that include vintage or rare Gripoix examples? Are there any pieces still in the archive? Did the family keep those pieces or that information?

Yes, we are trying to rebuild the archives for this we are using the informations from the auctions and we have a lot of reparations with vintage pieces, that we include each time in our datas. Mostly we are building new archives, we have drawers and we keep good records today of the drawings and sketches, like this I hope we can help the generations after us.

Do you have any past sketches we can see to better understand the process? Who usually does the sketches?

Yes. We have a creative team of professional drawers. Also, we like to work with interns. They are very creative, quick, fresh brains, and like this we always have a new member in the team. It’s always nice to have an active life in the workshop.

Take us from concept to the final product?

First we find a nice shape or a vintage piece what we would like to rework. We build a collection, for this we do a lot of sketches and colour trials. The way of the colour use is very important as this is our DNA. After we use the drawings to do the prototypes and if we are happy with the result of the metal part, we can flow the glass directly in the pieces. The last part is the guild, 24 Carat on the jewels, and of course we put the crystals or pearls after the gold finishing.

Books and articles to get you started:

Patrick Mauries. Maison Goossens Haute Couture Jewelry. Thames & Hudson.

Patrick Mauries. Jewelry By Chanel. Bulfinch.

Florence Muller. Costume Jewelry for Haute Couture. Vendome Press.

Ariel de Ravenel. Natasha Fraser-Cavassoni. Lou Lou de La Falaise. Rizzoli.

Jean Leymarie. Chanel. Skira / Rizzoli.

Alice Pfeiffer. Glass, with Class. Fashion and Style. New York Times.

Couture. The Great Designers. Caroline Reynolds Milbank.

  • This post is an attempt to research more specifically the history and future of the brand. I would love to talk to someone in the family, but could find no contact. I hope they have the drawings and images or samples, my intention here is to highlight the importance of preserving the Gripoix  design archive.

 

Blogger Grace Atwood Gives Us Her Accessories Low Down

blogger grace atwood blue ruffle red chanel bag

Blogger Grace Atwood of The Stripe, based in Brooklyn New York, serves us style on her blog offering up wearable, fun, and slightly sweet, yet fashion-forward options. As a rounded modern woman, she touches on beauty tips, books, and travel. So, how about her accessories taste? Well let’s just say that the BK blogger likes a good bag. She can often be spotted sporting a great Chanel piece or one of her latest handbag discoveries.

blogger grace atwood orange cross body bag

Is there a certain style of jewelry you find yourself gravitating towards?

Right now I’m all about a great statement earring or a bold cuff. When it’s really hot I have a hard time with necklaces, especially chokers. I love how they look but when it’s hot I just can’t do it. Right now I love a bold earring in a solid color (turquoise, cobalt blue, red) or solid gold/brass. It’s the perfect, easy way to add a bit of color to a little white dress. I also love just doing all gold. I have these gold oversized vintage Chanel drops that I bought last year and they’re one of my proudest purchases. Those + an armful of bangles = all you need to dress up any outfit.

Vintage jewelry seems to be a key component of your wardrobe, is that fair to say?
Also, what era or type of jewelry are you drawn to?

Absolutely. I am incredibly fortunate in that my grandmother the most amazing
collection of vintage jewelry. Pieces that she bought in the fifties and sixties but
also things that had been passed down to her from her mother and grandmother. Over the years my mom and aunts have given several pieces to me….

I have a few really special pieces of fine jewelry – an aquamarine bracelet from Tiffany’s that I wear on special occasions, a diamond ring and some really beautiful old Mexican silver pieces… but it’s actually the costume jewelry that I obsess over. I’m always
amazed by how fantastic the quality is. Costume jewelry just isn’t what it once was.
Back then, even a piece from Monet (which is still around and sold at Macy’s) would
last and last for years to come. Actually, my favorite necklace in the world is long
brass box chain necklace that was my grandmother’s. It’s vintage Monet!

In terms of an era, I’ve always loved the twenties (art deco is just the best for a
big night) but lately I have been obsessed with the fifties and early sixties. Old
Hollywood, the women Slim Aarons photographed… The Beverly Hills Hotel + Palm
Springs glamour… it’s everything!

blogger grace atwood oversized woven pom pom bag

What is one of your favorite pieces of personal jewelry, where is it from, and why
is it one of your favorites?

It’s so hard to pick a favorite but I would say it’s an art deco diamond ring from
the twenties. I bought it for myself (technically it was listed as an engagement
ring?) but I wear it almost all the time on my right hand. It’s one of my favorite
pieces not just because it’s so beautiful (like I said earlier, nothing compares to
the art deco pieces of the twenties) but also because I bought it for myself after a
good year… every time I look at it I feel like a bit of a boss for buying myself a
diamond ring.

Do you have a piece of jewelry that is sort of your go to?

A gold bangle from Julie Vos. It’s so simple but looks gorgeous with a tan and adds
a glamorous little touch to all my summer dresses. I have two of them – one with a
clear stone and another in pale blue. I am a freak about clutter but I always leave
one of them out so that I remember to wear it if I am running out the door and don’t
have on any jewelry.

Check out some of Grace’s current accessories picks: